HISTORY OF THE CHURCH AT KOLOA

Reverend Smith 1842-1847 - The Church At Koloa
Vintage Photo Of Koloa Church - Koloa Kauai Hawaii
Vintage Photo Of Koloa Church - Koloa Kauai Hawaii
Vintage Photo Of Koloa Church - Koloa Kauai Hawaii
Vintage Photo Of Koloa Church - Koloa Kauai Hawaii

History of the Koloa Church

The first missionaries arrived in Kauai around the year 1820.  They were brought to the island by George Kaumuali’i, son of King Kaumuali’i, the last ruling monarch of Kauai before King Kamehameha I took control and united all of Hawai’i.  George had been sent by his father to the United States to be educated in New England.  During these early times, people met in their homes and were visited occasionally by the missionaries who were in Waimea.

The Reverand Peter J. Guilick began the mission in Koloa in 1834.  With no official house of worship, they lived closely with each other in thatched houses and worked on the idea of building a church of there own.  In 1837, they built a chapel on the premises where the current church now stands.  Its original dimensions where 95 feet in length by 40 feet in width with an 8 foot lanai that went completely around the chapel.

Native Hawaiians came to the services from as far as Mahaulepu to Hanapepe and Koloa Beach to Ku’ia. These people, some on horseback, but mostly on foot, came all that way just to hear the Word of God.  Reports say that the early congregation numbered from nine to fifteen hundred.

The chapel served the congregation until 1859 when it was torn down to make way for a new frame building.  This undertaking was carried to completion through the energy and devotion of Reverand James W. Smith, M.D (pictured).  He served as a missionary, pastor and doctor from 1842 to 1887.  This new and improved church served the congregation for 70 years.  It stood as a silent witness to all of the changes which have occured in the islands over the years.

It was recorded in the Missionary Herald of 1860 that this church stood on the high ground and could be seen from far out to sea, forming a landmark which ships used for navigating as they approached port.  In 1929, the church underwent repairs and was given a New England style finish.  The Ohia (Hawaiian wood) timbers hewn by the Hawaiians in those early years are still supporting this church in their former positions, with the exception of a few timbers.  (This text was taken from the writings of Judge Henry Blake.  Some content has been edited for grammar.)

We at Koloa Church desire to remain on high ground providing a place where people who are wrestling with the storms of life can come and find rest and peace.  We pray you will find that “higher ground” here at The Church at Koloa.

History of the Koloa Church

The first missionaries arrived in Kauai around the year 1820.  They were brought to the island by George Kaumuali’i, son of King Kaumuali’i, the last ruling monarch of Kauai before King Kamehameha I took control and united all of Hawai’i.  George had been sent by his father to the United States to be educated in New England.  During these early times, people met in their homes and were visited occasionally by the missionaries who were in Waimea.

The Reverand Peter J. Guilick began the mission in Koloa in 1834.  With no official house of worship, they lived closely with each other in thatched houses and worked on the idea of building a church of there own.  In 1837, they built a chapel on the premises where the current church now stands.  Its original dimensions where 95 feet in length by 40 feet in width with an 8 foot lanai that went completely around the chapel.

Native Hawaiians came to the services from as far as Mahaulepu to Hanapepe and Koloa Beach to Ku’ia. These people, some on horseback, but mostly on foot, came all that way just to hear the Word of God.  Reports say that the early congregation numbered from nine to fifteen hundred.

The chapel served the congregation until 1859 when it was torn down to make way for a new frame building.  This undertaking was carried to completion through the energy and devotion of Reverand James W. Smith, M.D (pictured).  He served as a missionary, pastor and doctor from 1842 to 1887.  This new and improved church served the congregation for 70 years.  It stood as a silent witness to all of the changes which have occured in the islands over the years.

It was recorded in the Missionary Herald of 1860 that this church stood on the high ground and could be seen from far out to sea, forming a landmark which ships used for navigating as they approached port.  In 1929, the church underwent repairs and was given a New England style finish.  The Ohia (Hawaiian wood) timbers hewn by the Hawaiians in those early years are still supporting this church in their former positions, with the exception of a few timbers.  (This text was taken from the writings of Judge Henry Blake.  Some content has been edited for grammar.)

We at Koloa Church desire to remain on high ground providing a place where people who are wrestling with the storms of life can come and find rest and peace.  We pray you will find that “higher ground” here at The Church at Koloa.